Thank God I did not attend YU

I am just a mere two weeks away from finishing my undergraduate career at UCLA. Although I will be attending graduate school at UCLA next year, pursuing a one-year Master’s degree in religious history, I feel that now is an appropriate time to reflect on what I have gained from my college experience.

Four years ago, as my year in Yeshiva was ending, I was extremely pressured to attend Yeshiva University– so much so that I highly considered giving up my longtime dream of attending UCLA.  The last few months of my year in Yeshiva were filled with daily conversations with different Rabbis, each trying to convince me why it is an imperative to attend YU in the upcoming fall.  Each conversation was filled with a new horror story of why secular college was nothing short of evil and antithetical to all things religious.  Due to the fear that my Rabbis imposed on me, along with the fact that almost all of my good friends would be living in New York the following year, I had become convinced that I needed to go to YU.  However, my parents had other plans.  After many long and heated arguments, my parents were thankfully able to convince me that I should at least give UCLA a shot.  Reluctantly, I showed up to UCLA in the fall with the dangers and horrors of secular college, freshly brainwashed into my head.

My first few months at UCLA were nothing short of disastrous.  I would spend my days and nights alone learning in the Beit Midrash, afraid that any new friends would be a negative influence on my Judaism.  Accordingly, I was hesitant to join any student groups, sport’s teams, or go to any social events.  I initially came into UCLA as a math major, but soon realized that I needed to switch to an easier major that would allow me to spend more time learning Talmud.  I decided on Cognitive Science, a major that just made the cut as legitimate and “Sciency” enough to keep my parents happy, but easy enough that I would have ample time for learning.

My first two years in UCLA I must have spent an average of 8 hours a day learning.  This is by no means a testament to my ability to have balanced learning with the rest of my life; rather, it was my life.  My entire day would be based around learning.  I would bring a Gemera to most of my classes, learning while the teacher was lecturing; I would bring a Chumash to any social event into which I was dragged, and quietly learned on the side; I finished my homework as quickly as possible to allow more time for learning.  I even enrolled in a Smicha program, learning Hilchot Shabbat for hours into the night.  It became somewhat of a joke among my friends who had actually attended YU, how much more I was learning compared to them.

However, it is not for this reason that I am glad that I attended UCLA (although I can safely say that my Torah learning would have not been nearly as much if I went to YU).  In the last 2 years of college I learned so many invaluable lessons, that would have never been available to me had I turned down UCLA.  Towards the end of my second year of college, I decided to double major in Jewish studies.  To be completely honest, the first few Jewish studies classes in which I enrolled were for the sole purpose of obtaining easy A’s, fulfilling all of my general requirements, allowing me to spend even more time learning.  However, after about my fifth Jewish studies course I realized two things.  1) I was only a handful of courses away from a double major and 2) my professors knew a lot more than I would have thought.

As I became more interested in my academic Jewish studies courses, I switched from days filled with learning Talmud to days filled with learning Jewish Philosophy and History.  I began to step outside of my bubble of fear and began to embrace the college world.  I began to value my secular courses, both the Science and the Religious ones, always trying to learn as much as possible.  I joined many student groups, meeting new people, and coming into contact with new ideas and philosophies that I would have scoffed at just a few months before.  I spoke at and even helped run discussions revolving pluralism in the Hillel community and interfaith events in the wider UCLA community – talking to people of all sorts of backgrounds and beliefs.  I was able to rehash many of my lifelong hobbies soccer, rock climbing, and hiking.  While this transition was not easy, it was an important and necessary one in my college experience.

Had I gone to YU, I would have been a completely different person.  Had I gone to YU, I would know less Torah, science, history, and probably less about every other academic discipline.  Instead, I am graduating UCLA with having learned computer programing, neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, general religious history, Jewish history, and having learned almost a third of Shas, along with a comprehensive, in-depth knowledge of Hilchot Shabbat.  Had I gone to YU, I would have been trapped in the ridiculous dating world that is plaguing the Modern Orthodox community in New York, creating unnecessary stress and pressure amongst all its captives.  Instead, I was able to naturally meet a girl in college, date without the help of third-parties, cut out all the superficial nonsense that goes on in the YU dating world, and get engaged to the love of my life.

Had I gone to YU, I would still have a closed minded view of the world.  I would probably be enrolled in YU Smicha, with homogeneous peers, never taking time to challenge my own thought processes and beliefs.   I would still be skeptical of science, thinking that it is an anti-religious endeavor, and I would not respect or even consider any other philosophies that do not jive with an Orthodox view of the world.  I would still consider Reform and Conservative Judaism to be dangerous entities that must be stopped, and think that people of other religions and atheists were either evil or stupid.  Instead, I have branched out, trying to talk to as many people of different backgrounds as possible in my search for trying to understand the world.  I have even decided to attend graduate school this upcoming year to study of religious history, hoping to eventually becoming an educator in the field.

Attending YU would have been the worst mistake of my life from a social, educational, and religious standpoint.  By attending UCLA, I was able to grow in ways that would have been unthinkable, had I been stuck inside the small, religious bubble, deep inside Washington Heights.

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55 thoughts on “Thank God I did not attend YU

  1. You make a lot of assumptions about what would have attended had you gone to YU. Most of them are false and stereotypical. I can see where you’re coming from and I myself attended YU and I can see how there is a tendency for those things but we have a lot more control over our destiny than we think.

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  2. I applaud you for attending UCLA and double majoring, but your assumptions of YU are mostly wrong. This is a foolish article, written by someone who still has a lot of growing up to do.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Don’t judge an institution you have not attended. That is short sighted, immature and quite frankly, a bit hateful. I didn’t even go to YU, but I’m offended just based on the principle.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I applaud you for taking the time to air your grievances about a potential situation that DID NOT occur. Your perspective is Valid given it was your own experience. The struggle you did not air is over your openness to be “brain washed” and not think for yourself. Yes the experiences gleaned from secular college are unique, just as unique as a secular school without a strong vibrant Jewish (which you did have), vs a Jewish institution. The difficulty here is the establishment you chastised is the same approach another establishment which you joined preaches. Experiences are unique both to person, class year, and school. In the future you could potentially write about why giving opportunities a chance no matter the environment can help change and mold ones experience. Unfortunately you decided to belittle the growth and experience of everyone who didn’t attend UCLA after a year in Yeshiva in Israel.

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  5. Good for you. I’m glad you enjoyed UCLA and had an enriching experience.
    One question: Why do you think you would have learned less at YU? And whatever that answer may be, why would that be a chisaron in YU?
    Additionally, As someone that attended YU Smicha, I can say that – besides, obviously, for textual learning – you gain a lot of skills, including public speaking, life-cycle event training, pastoral training, internships, and much more – as well as a look at a myriad of contemporary issues facing Jewish continuity.

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    1. Yaakov – as someone who attended another college for undergrad and then YU semicha, I can attest that there’s a difference between learning about the contemporary issues facing the Jewish community, and facing those issues yourself.

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      1. Nu förstÃ¥r jag hur du menar, att kött är sÃ¥ dyrt till att börja med sÃ¥ en 100%-ig fördyring av det slÃ¥r rätt hÃ¥rt pÃ¥ husas¥llskhÃsan.

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  6. I think the other commenters are probably the exact type of YU students that the original poster is talking about. After attending YU for a wonderful and confusing three and a half years, I must say, this article, in my honest opinion is pretty spot on. Not saying it’s ok to publicly bash our university but unfortunately, I think a lot of of his points hold some truth.

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  7. I applaud you for writing this article, and hope yeshiva students currently in israel will heed your advice when facing the intense pressure applied by rabbis to switch to YU. We need to branch out and learn about the world in order to further our own jewish zionistic causes, and succesfully empathize and relate to other citizens of the world.

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  8. For some odd reason you personify a sort of bitterness towards YU. Just a bitter and sad article. I’m glad you enjoyed UCLA, but you honestly have no idea how things would have turned it had you attended YU. You took every stereotype and magnified it. Who knows maybe you would have met an even better girl there for you and you won’t realize that until many years down the line. The point is cut down on the bitterness and just be grateful you enjoyed UCLA without bashing a school you didn’t attend.

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  9. I’m glad you enjoyed your enriching experience at UCLA. But just as you speculated and predicted at first that UCLA would have been a harmful and detrimental experience, but turned for the positive. How can you now predict that YU would have had harmful effects as well since you’ve never attended? It seems like something you’ve uncovered in your journey is not always give into the stereotypes of a university, which is what you ended up doing to YU….

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  10. If I were to analyze this piece I would say that you actually feel bad and are slightly bitter for not attending YU and to make yourself feel better you tell yourself all these things (which are false, by the way) about the institution. It’s quite saddening because I usually love reading your posts. I understand that you are probably working out some issues that you didn’t think out fully when writing this.

    I’m don’t usually defend YU but I think you need to take a good look at your motivations for writing this and do some soul-searching and issue an apology. This article is Motzei Shem Ra

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  11. It sounds like you are primarily angry with your Rebbeim for giving you a false sense of gloom and doom had you attended an institution that you did not choose to attend. I would be, too, if they knew that I was committed to something and tried to convince me that I should not go.

    You speak of being brainwashed. Commitment to a consistent structure of learning is not brainwashing, but rather a matter of priorities. And once your priorities shifted, you looked back at your previous “self” with disdain. That has nothing to do with YU being the paradigm for Torah learning, but rather that you were recommitting yourself to what it means to be a learning Jew. There are many students at YU who undergo the same shift in priorities as you experienced, choose to spend more time learning topics of philosophy, and manage to do just fine.

    I won’t address your individual misconceptions about YU, but it appears that you feel the need to justify your choice by putting down an institution with which you have little practical experience. Richard Joel speaks to students from YU and Stern College during recruitment season, as well as while they are enrolled, and offers a kernel of brilliant humility. When asked about the pros and cons of attending YU over another university, he consistently says that he cannot comment on the experience of a student in another university, nor can he say what would be better for any particular student. He can only talk about what students at YU stand to gain.

    It is fabulous that you are capable of reflecting on all that you gained from your UCLA experience, but please reflect on your experiences with some humility. Realize that what you may have gained (or lost) by attending at YU is a mystery, and will remain so. You could just as easily be thanking God that you did not attend Brandeis University for many of the same reasons. Instead of thanking God that you did *not* attend YU, thank God that you attended UCLA and leave it at that.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. As a Yu student myself. I must say your article is completely accurate. Yu fails both religiously and academically in what’s expected in a Jewish college. It’s probably the most depressing place in the world.

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    1. So do yourself a favor and leave. I loved my time at YU. No one is forcing you to stay.

      Quick point:

      This guy has no idea what he is talking about. How could he? He never attended YU. I’m glad he enjoyed UCLA, let’s leave it at that.

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  13. Wow, it’s as if you have a window you can look through to see what life at YU is like. Better yet, it’s as if you have a crystal ball to see what your life would’ve been like at YU. Even if you assumptions are all accurate, which they are probably not by any standard, it’s very sad that you failed to mention one positive aspect of YU, one advantage you would have had if you went there, despite all of the potential drawbacks. For this reason, I discredit you and consider this a smear piece.

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  14. As a graduate of Yeshiva University, I can only attest to the rich and varied academic and social experiences that I shared as an undergraduate. YU gave me the opportunity to explore the best of Jewish and Western intellectual history, taught by faculty members who were the living embodiment of Torah u’Maddah. Through YU, I was also able to participate in global humanitarian missions, and to experience the vibrant New York cultural scene, with class trips to the Opera and some of the best museums in the entire world as part of my humanities curriculum. Personally, I found that the “homogenous” environment at YU paradoxically allowed me to explore ideas that went beyond the pale of Orthodoxy, as there was no danger of boundary maintenance, and in distinguishing myself from my non-religious peers. While this might not be every student’s experience, it certainly was my own, and I am proud to be a YU alumni member, just as you are rightly proud to be a UCLA alumnus.

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  15. Every institution has its strengths and weaknesses, including both YU and UCLA. Unfortunately, this post makes some pretty offensive, ugly assumptions about thousands of people who have attended or currently attend YU, including myself as well as the many, many people I am privileged to know and learn from who are wonderful, learned, caring and intelligent human beings. The ugly stereotype of a YU person you describe are actually exceptions at YU, not the rule. You’ve lived on the other side of the country for 4 years, didn’t even go to YU, and yet have the arrogance to write this uninformed, disdainful, somewhat slanderous piece…perhaps you just need more life experience, but I also think that maybe you need to relearn some of that Shas. Or maybe pick up a Tanach:
    .מי האיש החפץ חיים אוהב ימים לראות טוב; נצור לשונך מרע ושפתך מדבר מרמה
    Furthermore, סייג לחכמה שתיקה.

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  16. I write this comment as a current student at Yeshiva University. It sounds like you are employing the Freudian coping mechanism of displacement to aid your subconscious in conflict resolution as you project your anger towards the rabbis who mentored you in Israel, unrightfully so on YU. While some of those rabbis may be products of YU, please keep in mind that they are two separate academic entities. If you are still finding the brainwashing of your rabbis troublesome, perhaps sending a respectful email to them may help you gain some necessary closure. But certainly you do not need to bash YU. I find the title of this personal musing highly offensive and indicative of some incomplete reflection and in need for some more. It is also really disappointing to see the support of other non YU students or graduates, who also have no business commenting about a school they never went to. I’m so happy that you enjoyed UCLA, but not at the expense of Yeshiva University.

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  17. Seems to me you just took all the negative stereotypes you had about secular college (before having been there) and redirected them to YU (without having been there)…

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  18. A friend posted a link to this post on facebook, and I found aspects of it upsetting, so I decided to mention them here.
    First let me say, kudos to you on having such a great college experience and growing so much, that’s awesome!

    What bothered me was your characterization of the projected YU version of you. Unlike some of the other commenters I did not attend YU for college. (I did attend a YU graduate school, Revel, for a semester and a half, but it was not right for me and I dropped out.) There are two aspects of your disparaging YU which bothered me:
    1. The fact that you employed concepts relating to negative stereotypes of religious communities.
    2. By comparing actual you with theoretical you, and it made me feel like you were implying that anyone who went to YU would have the bad experience that you mentioned. (Though I know, that that could just be how you would have experience YU because of your personality. And maybe you think other people would have a good experience there.)

    My comment regarding number 2 in 2 paragraphs:

    p1: I think you were very lucky. When I was in college, I was at a point in my learning, where I could really benefited from a formal yeshivah program. I was also stretched pretty thin between classwork and procrastinating and some of my attempts at religious learning thus did not fully succeed. I did not take religious courses there (though I did take some good bible ones). I don’t know a third of shas or hilchos shabbos. And while I did find some really appreciate what I gained from some of my courses, they were not things that were unique to the secularness of the school.

    p2: By contrast I have no reason to assume that people at YU don’t have the same wonderful experience that you did. It’s interesting how you characterize your jewish studies courses. You thought they would not be meaningful, but they broadend you so much. I see no reason to assume that Jewish studies courses at YU would not have had the same effect on you. Yes, you think they would feel like they were coming from the bubble, but maybe they wouldn’t be! Maybe they would have been great. Maybe they would have had the same effect as the ones you took at UCLA. It’s really hard for me to believe the disparaging things you say about YU, when you didn’t even go there. Especially when I know a lot of great people who did.

    My comment regarding number 1 in a paragraph followed by dashes pretending to be bullets.

    There are two ways to read your characterization of your YU version of yourself. One is “he knows himself. He would be a way he doesn’t want to be” the other is “he thinks if he went to YU he’d be like THOSE crazies”. I saw aspects of the second in your writing which bothered me, because I found it hurtful, possibly untrue, and part of a trend which fosters bad will towards religious communities. Specifically (in order):
    – ” trapped in the ridiculous dating world “. I can’t tell you not to find the shidduch scene ridiculous. But I do think that it has it’s benefits. Right now I happen to be seeing someone I met naturally, but. Well I’m not the most extroverted person I know, and finding people can be difficult. I have friends who are looking and haven’t found anyone. And some of those friends are females and want to have children. The shidduch system does help people find people. As far as ridiculousness, the part which intersects with the YU world, is not that crazy. Just people help other people find other other people. You might think it’s ridiculous, and if you gave a reason for that, I wouldn’t necessarily attack your reason. But to just throw that comment out as though everyone agrees it’s ridiculous. Well, that was hard to read.
    – ” a closed minded view of the world”, and “skeptical of science, thinking that it is an anti-religious endeavor”. I lumped these two together because of their similarities. They are both things which are commonly said about religious people. The idea that some people think that science is anti-religion, has become particularly politicized recently. The stereotype of the uneducated religious fundamental who is skeptical about science and doesn’t believe in climate change, is something I feel like I see fairly frequently. And while some religious people may be like that, a lot aren’t. And I think it’s really non-productive when people see religious people in that light. And just the language itself makes me cringe. You make the YU version of yourself sound so backwards which is hard.
    – “people of other religions and atheists were either evil or stupid”. I may not have gone to YU, but I did go to yeshiva day school, and this is so far from what I experienced. Thinking that people from a different background were evil? Or stupid? And necessarily one? But, I’m sorry, this wasn’t my paragraph for disagreeing with, it’s for stereotypes. Yeah, I guess I don’t have much to say here that I didn’t already say. This is just another example of a negative religious stereotype, which I really don’t find to be true, and hurts to hear.

    Lastly, you happened on a particular pet peeve of mine, which is when people divide the world into two categories: the secular world and the religious bubble. (So yes the rabbbis who warned you about secular college hit on this too.) Modern Orthodox people (and by that I mean the torah umaddah strand of modern orthodoxy which I think stend from Rabbi Soloveitchik) in particular tend to make this separation. And conflate “the world outside religious communities” with “the grand and enlightening ivory tower”. Thus the in characterization that emerges the religion community is closed by contrast. In reality though, there are many different kinds of communities. (I don’t pretend to know most of them.) But there are lots of different people with different perspectives. And I wouldn’t want to disparage certain orthodox communities, for not being like a set of college campuses, any more than I’d want to disparage the members of any non-jewish community for wanting to have jobs to support their families and not knowing “computer programing, neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, general religious history”. Especially when education in, well at least in the modern orthodox community (which YU tends to be affiliated with), is pretty high.

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  19. Actually, given all the ideas inimical to classic Halachic Judaism you seem to have embraced, your Rabbis’ concerns appear to have been entirely valid…

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  20. I didn’t go to YU (never even considered it). While I agree with the author, I do think that some of his issues were his own. Bringing sefarim to class and social events is rude and not something that YU teaches you to do. On the other hand, I don’t think that the author is blaming YU for this. I think he had his own issues to work through and UCLA provided him with the right atmosphere for bursting out of his yeshiva bubble and doing that. It’s not so much what YU made him do but what it didn’t allow him to do. I do agree about the shiduch train thing though.

    Either way, Jews should go to a non-Jewish college just to piss off Rabbi Schachter.

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  21. I write as a YU grad from 1969, but mainly I write as a psychologist for the past 45 years.

    You succeeded.

    You manged to annoy those of us who loved YU and you won the praise of those who did not. You succeeded in drawing attention to yourself.

    Your description of your fantasy about YU is like a response to a Rorschach ink blot or a TAT card. As another person wrote above…pure projection.

    I found your article sad and I have no idea why you felt the need to write it. I also have no idea about the family you grew up in and how they shaped your views on Jewish education. You don’t say where they went to university. That also has a big impact on how students experience YU.

    Your description of how you handled the first two years, if accurate, reveal serious deficits of you ability to adapt to any new environment.

    It is good that you did not go to YU. Given your rigidity you would have made yourself miserable. If you only wanted a Talmud education you should have gone to Lakewood.

    However if you actually learn about the YU grads and their succsses you will see how you missed out being with brilliant Orthodox Jewish students who indeed combine Torah Umadah. YU has never been perfect, but YU grads are the proudest Jews that I know.

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    1. I think its great that Josh Hutcherson is standing up for gay rights i mean he’s a guy were everyone knows his name so i think people will listen to him.And if theres anything I want to do in life it’s make a di:ecreneff)

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  22. Although in your case going to UCLA might have been the right choice for you, what do you gain by writing this article? Not everyone is like you. I’m very happy and impressed that you were able to go and learn on your own and keep a religious background, but by writing this article, this can only be doing damage to the Jewish community all over the US. There could be kids who are not as disciplined as your (learning wise) and would succumb to negative pressure in a secular college.
    Point is. Yes, it is very your story is very impressive and I am very happy that you can keep up your Judaism in a secular environment, but you don’t know how this could negatively affect other Jews in a worse situation than you.

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  23. Mazal Tov on your graduation from UCLA. I do have to agree that attending a secular university is a great way to expand your knowledge, but most of the courses that you mentioned that you had learned are all courses you could have taken at YU. Also, don’t bash YU because you had a better experience at UCLA, they are two completely different universities, and your speculations about what would have happened to you at YU could be false. Many people that end up going YU don’t come out with the same goal that they started with. I also dislike the fact of you calling people who go to YU closed minded. Many of the people that I have met at YU are very open minded and a lot of the alums are also open minded. You are making the assumption that every YU guy in the 6 hour morning seder program is closed minded. I can attest to that belief and say that it is truly false. Most of my peers in MYP are very open minded individuals. Your assumptions are just based off of the information you hear about YU, but you have no experience to prove your statements. This would have been a great article if you were just describing your life in secular college, but immediately when you started attacking YU, the article turned sour. Since I am currently a YU student, I feel attacked by this article. This article shows a lot of problems with Jews, how we can’t accept one another. Why does it matter what university you go to, and why do you have to compare it to someone else’s experience. There are also a ton of guys who come out of YU, who have learned a lot, and there are many who aspire to learn most of shaas by the time they graduate. So to conclude, stop bashing YU and making stupid assumptions. What we need in Judaism is unity and this article is part of the reason why we cannot achieve it. So calm down and focus on making the world a better place by not attacking other Jews no matter the circumstance. There are good times to be harsh towards other Jews, but this is not one of those times. Maybe next time you should consult with a few people before you write a stupid article making a comparison that is not %100 correct. Thank you and have a great day!

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  24. I’m not a psychologist, but this seems like a classic case of cognitive dissonance and the erroneous strategy you employ to reduce it. This article appears to be your way of dealing with pressure applied by your rebbaim on yeshiva, which is clearly still eating away at you. There are much better ways to deal with cognitive dissonance and I hope you’re able to discover one that works for you. Hopefully the overwhelmingly negative comments you’ve received on this article will serve as a wake up call to work out your issues in a healthier way.

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  25. Congratulations! I wish you good luck and success in all of your endeavors ever. Usually, while achieving successfully embracing ones own successes, overrides urges to engage in comparison and prejudicial aspirations.
    Wishing you real success in all of your real life experiences forever.

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  26. You think you learned torah to the same level you would have at YU? Reading artscroll daf yomi pales in comparison to learning in Chavrua biyun for 3 to 4 hours and then having shiur by a renowned rosh yeshiva.

    There is only so much time in the day and in one’s life. You can’t argue that you accomplished more in less time. YU is like a pressure cooker. You spend more time learning than any other college that’s why it is often depressing. There is no way you accomplished more without putting in the same amount of time.

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  27. Good for you for going after your dreams. Staying insulated and isolated is not a good idea. I don’t understand why most people don’t see that. And thank you for sharing. Hopefully it’ll encourage someone else to go on their own derech.

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  28. I graduated YU 3 years ago and I thank God every single day that I went there. It was and forever will be the best decision of my life. I am sorry you did not have the opportunity to see what a beautiful and inspiring school and family YU is.

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  29. Wow.. It looks like you still can’t forgive yourself for not attending YU. Do you seriously think your Jewish studies classes at UCLA can compare to YU? Do you think the discussions in your Bible or JH class with peers who can’t tell an alef from a bet were on the same level than at a YU class? I just graduated from YU and one thing I can say for sure: Thank God I didn’t go to UCLA… this guy would have been my classmate 🙂 And BTW, your’e Really cool that you think that Reform Jews and atheists aren’t evil….

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  30. Were you one of the 18.2% applicants who were not accepted to YU? Don’t worry, you can still be a successful Jew even if you didn’t attend YU!

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  31. So you gave up learning torah to play soccer and go hiking and now life is so much more enjoyable?

    Congrats on going off the derech!

    What you would have learned at YU is how to have more conviction in torah and take the path of struggle vs the easy way. It is much easier to live a liberal secular life of “I’ll do what makes me happy”. What you could have learned at YU is the character to live a full halachic life which may not always be easy but in the long run – more meaningful.

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    1. Come on World, get behind it discoveries like this too important to be ignored. Tough one to fund during &#e286;Aust1rity’ measures though. All visitors to Italy stand in awe of the architectural accomplishments of the Ancient Rome.

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  32. Sounds like a good running week. That tummy thing must have sucked though. Knock wood, I&v1827;#e never not been able to find a bathroom in time.As far as hills, a lot of times I power up them, just to get them over with. Other times, I just try to keep a steady pace. Kind of depends on what mood I’m in and how many miles I’m doing.MCM Mama

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  33. Unhhh…nope. I put VA/Medicare/Medicaid up there because they ARE comparo points.Unlike Obama, who lies by nature, I think the discussion should be fair and accurate.Now shall we talk about Medicare/Medicaid cost-shifting, which is also called &qoto;rationing&quut;?

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  34. The people in Western nations who are most fervently against racism, sexism and religious bigotry are also those most fervently in favour of mass immigration from countries where racism, sexism and religious bigotry are far worse than in Western nations. I think this is evidence of liberalism’s creipo-ryltgious nature: religions gain a lot of their power from their contradictions, because no-one need invest emotional energy in believing the obvious.

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  35. Going back to last season, a few of the major weaknesses on this team were lack of speed, which is related to poor transition defense……. Outside shooting……. Poor bench.So what does Brown do to fix these problems? He makes the team even slower by putting Artest at SG and Jamison at SF, than benches the best outside shooter and one of the more athletic players on the bench in Meeks. He than makes incomprehensible rotations to destroy the confidence of the bench players o start the season. Don’t be surprised if the Master of Panic has another panic attack and decides to play Gasol at SF and Hill at SG.

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